Northeast Counterdrug Training Center

2016/2017

COURSE CATALOG


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MISSION

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The mission of the Northeast Counterdrug Training Center is to provide cost-effective counterdrug education and advanced training to fight domestic and transnational drug trafficking organizations that threaten public safety and national security.


REGISTER ONLINE:

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Go to www.counterdrug.org. Click on “Registration.” Click on “User” and select “Create Account” to establish your profile. Your profile will enable you to browse the full schedule of courses and make your selection(s) online.

NCTC Training Coordinators are available 7:00am–4:30pm M–F by phone, 1.800.806.6293, to assist you with your selections, or you can e-mail NCTC at register@counterdrug.org.

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PROFESSIONAL CLASSIFICATIONS

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Law Enforcement

Investigators

Corrections

Law Enforcement Support

Military Intelligence

Counterdrug and Military Personnel

CBOs

 

COURSE CONCENTRATION GUIDE

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Courses are grouped by concentration. Courses may appear in more than one area of concentration.

LAW ENFORCEMENT/ INTERDICTION

Leadership

Leading and Managing the Drug Task Force Unit

Military Decision-Making Process (MDMP)

Operations and Interdiction

Drug Interdiction and Conducting the Complete Traffic Stop

Fire Arms Training Simulator (FATS) Methamphetamine Clandestine Lab

Safety

Mexican Drug Cartel Investigations Mexican Drug Cartels

Narcotics Enforcement and Trafficking Investigations in Hotels/Motels and Parcel/Freight Carriers

Tactical Entry to Methamphetamine Laboratories

Tactics for Narcotics Warrants Vehicle Interdiction (Commercial) Vehicle Interdiction (Passenger)

Interrogation

Courtroom Testimony in Narcotics Cases

Detecting Misleading Behavior in Narcotics Investigations

Drug Case Preparationa and Analysis Interview and Interrogation in Narcotics

Cases

Interview and Interrogation in Narcotics Cases (Advanced)

NCTC Polygraph Program Senior Polygraph Examiner Undercover

Managing Narcotics Informants Physical Surveillance

Role of the Undercover

Top Gun: Undercover Drug Investigation

Undercover Management Undercover Risk Analysis

Video Surveillance for Drug Investigations

Specialized Topics

Basic Narcotics Investigator

Cell Phone Use in Drug Trafficking Investigations

Drug Diversion Investigation Drug Identification

Financial Planning for Counterdrug Strategies

Indoor Marijuana Investigations Indoor Marijuana Officer Safety Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs and the

Narcotics Connection Pharmaceutical/Prescription Drug

Investigations Social Networking

Spanish for the Uniformed Patrol and Drug Interdiction Officer Phase I

Spanish for the Uniformed Patrol and Drug Interdiction Officer Phase II

Street Gang Narcotics Investigations

Trauma Management

NARCO-TERRORISM

Terrorism Overview Domestic Terrorism Introduction to Narco-Terrorism

Mexican Drug Cartel Investigations Mexican Drug Cartels

Money Laundering

Intelligence

Basic Narcotics Investigator

Cell Phone Use in Drug Trafficking Investigations

Detecting Misleading Behavior in Narcotics Investigations

Intelligence Manager

Interview and Interrogation in Narcotics Cases

Interview and Interrogation in Narcotics Cases (Advanced)

Law Enforcement Intelligence–Basic Managing Narcotics Informants Mexican Drug Cartel Investigations Mexican Drug Cartels

Middle Eastern Intelligence Social Networking

Tactical Narcotics Debriefing Technology Threats and Trends in

Narcotics Invstigations Terror Threat Finance (DIA) Terrorism Intelligence Gathering

DRUG DEMAND REDUCTION

CADCA: National Coalition Academy Communities for Drug-Free Living Lead and Seed Startup

NATIONAL GUARD BUREAU COUNTERDRUG

ArcGIS II Essential Workflows (NGB) ArcGIS III Performance Analysis (NGB)

Counterdrug Senior Leaders Seminar (NGB)

Criminal Intelligence Analysis Phase I (NGB)

Criminal Intelligence Analysis Phase II (NGB)

MILITARY-LED INSTRUCTION

Communities for Drug-Free Living Criminal Intelligence Analysis Phase I (NGB)

Criminal Intelligence Analysis Phase II (NGB)

Fire Arms Training Simulator (FATS) Intelligence Fundamentals and Analysis Intelligence Leader

Intelligence Preparation of the Operational Environment (IPOE)

Lead and Seed Startup

Military Decision-Making Process (MDMP)

National Guard Substance Abuse Training (NGB)

National Planners’ Course Tactical Mission Planning Technical Support

Threat Assessment Trauma Management

Unit Prevention Leader (UPL) (NGB)

Woodland Tactical

 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

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ArcGIS II ESSENTIAL WORKFLOWS (NGB)

In this course, you will acquire fundamental skills needed to author, share, and use geographic information and maps across the ArcGIS system. You will learn how to efficiently find, explore, manage, and analyze geographic data and create informative maps that showcase your work. The course covers a variety of techniques to effectively share GIS maps and resources with decision- makers, stakeholders, and the public.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Use ArcGIS software and content to create high-quality maps that combine data from different sources.

  2. Organize, create, and edit geographic data so that it is accurate and up-to-date.

  3. Manage, symbolize, and label map layers to support visualization and data exploration.

  4. Design an attractive page layout for maps that will be printed.

  5. Apply a standard workflow to analyze GIS data and solve spatial problems.

  6. Deliver maps and analysis results to multiple platforms so they are accessible to other ArcGIS users and to non-GIS users.

Prerequisites: Introductory-level knowledge of GIS concepts and limited ArcGIS experience.

Course Length: 3 days/24 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Military.


ArcGIS III PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS (NGB)

Advance your foundational ArcGIS skills by learning how to obtain reliable results from different types of GIS analysis. You will apply a standard workflow to efficiently solve spatial problems us- ing a variety of ArcGIS tools and vector, raster, and temporal data. Techniques to effectively share your analysis workflows and results are covered. This course is taught using ArcGIS for Desktop Advanced and some course exercises use tools provided in the ArcGIS Spatial Analyst extension.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Choose appropriate data, methods, and tools to plan, execute, and document a given analysis project.

  2. Automate analysis tasks using geoprocessing models.

  3. Create a weighted suitability model to select the optimal location for a new site.

  4. Apply spatial statistics to examine distribution patterns and identify hot spots.

  5. Model temporal data to analyze and visualize change over time.

  6. Share analysis results so they are accessible and repeatable.

Prerequisites: Introductory-level knowledge of GIS concepts and limited ArcGIS experience.

Course Length: 1 day/8 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Military (GIS analysts, specialists, and others who man- age or conduct GIS analysis projects).


BASIC NARCOTICS INVESTIGATOR

This course provides students with an overview of the narcotics investigation process. Topics will include most current constitutional drug law, commonly abused drugs, confidential infor- mants and sources, investigative strategies, undercover operations, marijuana grow operations,

clandestine methamphetamine labs, evidence collection and admissibility, searches, children living in dangerous drug environments, and liability issues. This course will be accomplished entirely in the classroom. This course is also directed towards the officer with limited or no experience for narcotics investigation.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. List and identify the most commonly abused drugs and their origin, street value, manufacture, packaging, and smuggling.

  2. Describe development, use, and control of confidential informants and confidential sources.

  3. Identify seizable assets.

  4. List and describe various investigative strategies to include controlled buys, hand-to-hand buys, surveillance, conspiracy, and domestic interdiction.

  5. Describe undercover operation planning, operation, risks involved, legal issues, and reporting and documentation.

  6. Describe marijuana growing operations, methods, and indicators.

  7. Describe clandestine lab operations, methods, and indicators.

  8. List and describe aspects of evidence collection and admissibility in court.

  9. Describe procedures and legal issues concerning searches.

  10. Give a brief overview of agency and taskforce relationships.

  11. Describe the role of law enforcement in dealing with children living in dangerous drug environments.

  12. List and describe liability and ethics issues relating to narcotics investigations.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 5 days/40 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement.


CADCA: NATIONAL COALITION ACADEMY

The National Coalition Academy is a year-long coalition development program that includes class- room instruction, distance learning, and online support. The course develops individual skills in each of the 15 core competency areas for community problem solving. Through distance instruc- tion and technical assistance, the course also helps newly formed local coalitions engage in the 12 essential processes research suggests are associated with achieving community-level outcomes.

Week I • Creating and Maintaining Coalitions and Partnerships: Assessing Community Needs and Resources; Analyzing Problems and Goals; Developing a Framework or Model of Change; Developing Interventions.

Week II • Strategic and Action Planning: Building Leadership; Enhancing Cultural Competence;

Evaluating the Initiative; Advocating for Change.

Week III • Increasing Participation and Membership; Influencing Policy Development; Improv- ing Organizational Management and Development; Writing Grant Applications; Sustaining the Work or Initiative.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Create and maintain coalitions and partnerships.

  2. Assess community needs and resources.

  3. Analyze problems and goals.

  4. Develop a framework or model of change.

  5. Develop strategic action plans.

  6. Build and strengthen leadership.

  7. Develop interventions.

  8. Increase participation and membership.

  9. Enhance cultural competence.

  10. Advocate for change.

  11. Influence policy development.

  12. Evaluate initiatives.

  13. Write grant applications for funding.

  14. Improve organizational management and development.

  15. Sustain projects and initiatives.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: Week I: 5 days/40 hours. Week II: 5 days/40 hours. Week III: 5 days/40 hours.

Who May Attend: CADCA selects students through its network of member coalitions. Further information may be found at www.cadca.org.


CELL PHONE USE IN DRUG TRAFFICKING INVESTIGATIONS

This course is a detailed introduction to how cell phone data can be used by investigators to enhance drug trafficking investigation. Instruction will cover use of historical communication data (records), real-time surveillance options, physical cell phone forensics considerations, and solu- tions that all law enforcement personnel should know. Legal issues about how to obtain and use this data will be covered as well as surveillance operations considerations, company-specific con- siderations, courtroom presentation issues, and other related matters. At the end of this course, students will have a very thorough understanding of what is possible with communication data in narcotics investigations, the several primary categories of available data, and how to determine the servicing companies for communications devices and accounts.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the primary categories of data that are available from cell phones, including:

    1. Data from physical devices such as cell phones themselves, traditionally retrievable using forensic techniques.

    2. Activation, subscriber, and payment information.

    3. Communication/call detail records with and without geographic information.

    4. Law enforcement surveillance data from cell phones, such as traps and traces, pen registers Communications Assistance to Law Enforcement Act (CALEA) delivery, field device loca- tions, “target development,” and communications intercept (aka “wiretaps”).

  2. Determine the company that services a phone number, and Internet Protocol (IP) address, e-mail address, and web address.

  3. Determine which provider company to contact.

  4. Determine how to contact a specific provider company.

  5. List the primary categories of legal demands that are used to lawfully obtain data and authorize surveillances, including customer consent, emergency legal demands, subpoenas, court orders, and search warrants.

  6. Describe the primary tools that may be used to map cell phone geographic data such as Micro- soft Streets and Trips and Iconico’s Screen Protractor software.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 2 days/16 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Investigators, LEA Support.


COMMUNITIES FOR DRUG-FREE LIVING

This military-led course is a series of professionally-produced student videos and an adult video designed to be shown in a classroom or assembly. The student videos meet PA Department of Education Standards in Concepts of Health and Healthful Living for third, sixth, ninth, and twelfth grades.

  1. The adult video is designed to educate parents that drug abuse isn’t confined to any particular region, race, social, or economic status. A mother shares her story of helping her son over- come addiction, a man talks about his addiction, and a substance abuse counselor includes warning signs for parents to be aware of.

  2. The student videos are set up to receive student feedback via our voting devices. Questions are embedded within the video for students to answer while they are watching the video. They also have a valuable Staff Climate Survey, which is done anonymously online with a school password. The data from the student responses and staff responses are provided in chart form for the school administration to compare. The elementary school video is titled “Choices,” the middle school video is titled “If You Can Dream It, You Can Do It,” and the high school video is titled “The Power of Positive.”

Upon successful completion of the course, attendees will be able to:

  1. Identify behaviors and other warning signs of drug abuse.

  2. Understand who trusted adults are.

  3. Make good choices using the STAR method.

  4. Set achievable goals.

  5. Realize that most students are not using drugs or alcohol.

  6. Overcome negative circumstances without turning to drugs or alcohol.

Prerequisites: None for the adult video. Scheduling occurs for the student videos upon completion of the Staff Survey.

Course Length: 1 hour.

Who May Attend: Community-Based Organizations.


COUNTERDRUG SENIOR LEADERS SEMINAR (NGB)

The Counterdrug Senior Leaders Course (CD-SLC) will provide a basic understanding of the various facets of the regulatory requirements involved in managing a state Counterdrug (CD) program. This seminar focuses on an initial introduction and overview of the CD program facets.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Comprehend the policies, procedures, and responsibilities governing the usage of the National Guard and Department of Defense resources in the National Guard Counterdrug program.

Prerequisites: Prior to attending the seminar, CDCs should become familiar with NGR 500-2 and applicable NGB-CD All States letters, the FTSMCS Handbook, and the CPE Checklist. CDCs should bring with them the State Plan and the State SOP (if applicable).

Course Length: 5 days/40 hours.

Who May Attend: Counterdrug Coordinators, select CD leadership approved by the respec- tive CDC.


COURTROOM TESTIMONY IN NARCOTICS CASES

This course is designed to improve your skills in testimony, to increase your awareness of the court system processes, and guide you to better understand your important role which will in- crease your ability to be successful. One of the most important tools often overlooked during the training cycle of law enforcement officers throughout their careers is how to win in court. Those involved with investigative and enforcement activities should be aware that successful law enforce- ment initiatives do not end at the conclusion of an investigation, arrest, and/or issuance of a traffic citation. In fact, the investigation, arrest, or citation is only the beginning stage of many, in what appears to be a never-ending legal process. It is only at the end of this entire process that

includes and encompasses the totality of the prosecution, defense, and trial phase of a case that results in a conclusion for the officers involved.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate testimony skills in narcotics investigations.

  2. Display an increased knowledge and awareness of the court process.

  3. Exhibit the understanding of language pragmatics during cross examination.

  4. Recognize the anticipation of defense strategies and tactics.

  5. Describe the importance of narcotics evidence and preparation prior to trial for its presenta- tion.

  6. Demonstrate knowledge of the importance of proper narcotics and its relevance during testi- mony.

  7. Exhibit the understanding of the necessity of pre-criminal trial preparation relationship with the prosecutor.

  8. List civil litigation awareness, preparation, and testimony strategies.

  9. Display an understanding of how to minimize testimony pitfalls.

  10. Describe basic common definitions for testimony validity.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 2 days/16 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement.


CRIMINAL INTELLIGENCE ANALYSIS PHASE I (NGB)

This basic-level course is designed to provide an understanding of how to operate as a criminal analyst (2B) as specified in NGR500-2/ANGI-10-801. This course provides basic instruction of how to conduct criminal intelligence analysis in support of Law Enforcement (LE) as described in Mission 2b of NGR 500-2/ANGI-10-801.

Course content: Support Operations, Criminal Analyst Duties and Responsibilities, Informa- tion Research, Link Analysis, Financial and Commodity Flow Analysis, Events and Activity Analysis, Communications Analysis, Analytical Product Development, Threat Assessments, Information Management, Dissemination Techniques.

Class size: Minimum 15 students; maximum 30 students.

Prerequisites: NGB personnel assigned to Counterdrug Criminal Analysis position.

Course Length: 5 days/40 hours.

Who May Attend: Attendees should be Soldiers or Airmen requiring an orientation and familiarization of basic individual and collective tasks required to provide effective criminal intelligence analysis in support of a drug taskforce.


CRIMINAL INTELLIGENCE ANALYSIS PHASE II (NGB)

This course provides advanced instruction of how to conduct criminal intelligence analysis in sup- port of law enforcement (LE) narcotics investigations as described in Mission 2b of NGR 500-2/ ANGI-10-801. Attendees should be Soldiers or Airmen requiring an orientation and familiarization of advanced individual and collective tasks required to provide effective criminal intelligence analysis support. Graduates of this course will be awarded an ASI/SEI.

Course content: Legal Aspects, Overview of World Drug Trends, Information Research, Evidence Exploitation, Advanced Communications Analysis, Advanced Financial Analysis, Crime Forecasting, Train Analytical Skills, communications intercept, gang familiarization.

Class size: Minimum 15 students; maximum 30 students.

Prerequisites:

  1. Criminal Intelligence Analysis Course Phase I or approved Phase I waiver.

  2. Basic Computer Skills (Microsoft Office).

  3. Secret Security Clearance (or Interim).

  4. Minimum six months in an Intel position.

Course Length: 7 days/56 hours.

Who May Attend: Any Soldier or Airman assigned to a Criminal Intelligence analysis position that has completed PH I or equivalent waiver.


DETECTING MISLEADING BEHAVIOR IN NARCOTICS INVESTIGATIONS

This course focuses on identifying and developing confidence in understanding the various ways and methods persons use to deceive police officers. Through practical application, students

use various methods to develop skills necessary for detecting verbal, nonverbal, and written modes of deception. Though a series of lecture and practical-based programs, students learn to detect deception and avoid common pitfalls. This interactive class is superbly suited for the new investigator or patrol officer. By learning to professionally identify deceptive words, phrases, and non-verbal behaviors, the student gains confidence and skill in redirecting a person’s words to obtain a confession. Confidence is further gained when students practice their new-gained skills during actual interrogations in a class setting. The experienced law enforcement instructor uses actual case investigations and scenarios to reinforce the skills necessary to prepare for a success- ful criminal prosecution. Through this unique interactive class, the officer and investigator learn that being deceptive isn’t easy at all.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

    1. Give a brief history of interrogation.
    2. Describe the traits of an effective interviewer.
    3. Explain why people confess to misconduct.
    4. Explain and identify the five stress states.
    5. Define proxemics and explain how it influences the interview process.
    6. Define ethical behavior and know why it is important.
    7. Demonstrate the ability to read between the lines in a written statement.
    8. Explain why the interview and interrogation process is actually a communication persuasion process.
    9. Describe a strategy for successful interviewing.
    10. Define body language (kinesics) and how to use it to your advantage.
    11. Use the “behavior inducing technique” to structure interview questions.
    12. Define and use the “cognitive interview technique.”
    13. Perform a successful interview and interrogation.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 3 days/24 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Corrections, Military (SF and MP only).


DOMESTIC TERRORISM

Participants in this course learn about domestic terrorist groups, how to recognize indicators relating to domestic terrorism, and funding through narco-terrorism. Students explore law enforce- ment’s roles and responsibilities in combating domestic terrorism. Officer safety issues relating to domestic terrorism are also covered.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Define domestic terrorism and contrast it to other forms of terrorism.

  2. Describe funding sources including illegal and controlled drugs.

  3. Identify major domestic terrorist groups and potential targets.

  4. Explain how domestic terrorist groups recruit and operate.

  5. Identify where domestic terrorist groups are found geographically.

  6. Recognize indicators relating to domestic terrorism.

  7. Distinguish between protest groups and domestic terrorists.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 2 days/16 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Corrections, Military Intelligence.


DRUG CASE PREPARATION AND ANALYSIS

This course is a scientific, investigative tool used to analyze written and/or oral statements taken from a person of “interest.” That person need not be the suspect of criminal activity, but alter- natively, it works equally well with statements from victims, complainants, and/or witnesses since the ultimate goal is to identify the truth. And because there is no initial “one-on-one” contact with the person, it eliminates or holds to minimum biases, prejudices, and preconceived judgments that oftentimes affect an investigator’s judgment. FSA systematically determines the use and omis- sions of specific words, phrases, content, grammar, and other identifiers to determine a truthful,

balanced statement. A person’s own words will ultimately and unwittingly betray them as they provide indicators of deception through their hidden clues of “omissions,” “improper changes in language,” “lack of commitment,” as well as identifying close and distant relationships to other persons, objects, and events. These and many other indicators are made obvious and readily identifiable to the trained investigator. In advanced applications, statements can also be converted into numbers whereby they are subjected to a mathematical formula resulting in three numbers to determine a balanced statement. Attendees are further challenged to perform verbal analysis through the viewing of actual videotaped oral interviews to support the effectiveness of FSA. To further reinforce their proficiencies and understanding of these concepts, attendees are assigned individual homework.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the importance and the process by which they will solicit a verbal or written statement.

  2. Explain the methodology and reasoning of “rationalization” and recognize indicator.

  3. Use FSA to analyze every word using five colored highlighters that are assigned to specific parts of speech and grammar.

  4. Detect the truth and deception by then carefully preparing questions to aid them in verifying the information provided by the subject as well as identifying missing information within that statement to further their investigation.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 3 days/24 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Law Enforcement Support (human resource personnel), Military (investigators).


DRUG IDENTIFICATION

The course will educate and supply information regarding the preliminary field identification of illegal and diverted legal drugs, as well as associated paraphernalia to law enforcement person- nel. The course should serve as a tool and aid in the identification drugs, aimed at the reduction of usage and illicit sales. The course provides for definitions of basic drug terminology and the scheduling of drugs based on Controlled Substance ACT (CSA). Information will be provided on the chemical make-up of controlled substances as well as the manner in which they are produced for human consumption. This course of instruction will describe the manner in which the con- trolled substances are introduced into the human body and physical reactions caused by the use of dangerous controlled substances.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Define:

    1. Narcotics

    2. Stimulant

    3. Depressant

    4. Hallucinogen

    5. Sterol substances

  2. Visually identify:

    1. Cannabis Sativa—in both natural and processed states

    2. Cocaine

    3. Opiates

    4. Hallucinogens

    5. Anabolic steroids

    6. Inhalants

  3. Define the CSA schedule and the criteria for scheduling dangerous controlled substances under this act.

  4. Describe the psychological and physiological responses of the human body when under the influence of controlled substances listed under the CSA.

  5. Describe the processing method for preparing controlled substances for human ingestion.

  6. Identify the weighted amounts of controlled dangerous substances as they are packaged for distribution.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 2 days/16 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Corrections, Military, Community-Based Organizations.


DRUG INTERDICTION AND CONDUCTING THE COMPLETE TRAFFIC STOP

This course is designed for veterans and newcomers alike. It focuses on the relationship between traffic enforcement and drug interdiction enforcement. Specific techniques are covered to assist officers in detecting drug trafficking activity. Students will receive extensive instruction in road- side interviews, which include hands-on training with vehicles equipped with aftermarket-installed false compartments used to conceal drugs, money, and weapons. Students will also participate in mock roadside interviews in an effort to detect deception.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the relationship between increased traffic enforcement and reduction of drug trafficking.

  2. Describe several case studies to show how traffic enforcement reduces drug trafficking.

  3. Identify certain indicators of criminal activity and their meaning.

  4. Describe reasons and justifications for traffic stops.

  5. Describe and understand pre-textual stops.

  6. Describe types of searches.

  7. Describe techniques for the officer to use at the stop.

  8. Demonstrate a working knowledge and understanding of some of the imaginative areas crimi- nals use to conceal illegal narcotics.

  9. Describe how to safely access these compartments in various vehicles.

  10. Describe how to make a set of “Alligator Clips” to use in breaching hidden compartments.

  11. Identify techniques of Narcotics Evidence Handling.

  12. Identify ways to minimize risks from traffic conditions at the stop.

  13. Identify ways to safely interact with the vehicle occupants while making a traffic stop.

  14. Identify the importance of a “passenger side approach.”

  15. Identify safety procedures to consider while conducting searches of vehicles.

  16. Identify special Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety issues during a stop.

Prerequisites: None. Course Length: 2 days/16 hours. Who May Attend: Law Enforcement.


FINANCIAL PLANNING FOR COUNTERDRUG STRATEGIES

This practical grant writing course will provide the participant with the fundamental skills needed to develop financial planning strategies for grant funding for the development of policing strate- gies and grant programs for the reduction of drugs and substance abuse, drug-related crime, and violence. The course will provide the tools needed to research, develop, write, and submit suc- cessful grant proposals. The participant will be presented with the concepts of grant development, the components of a grant, how to research and identify funding sources, and how to develop and submit a complete grant proposal. To gain maximum benefit from this course, all participants must come to the course with a project idea or a specific request for proposal. At the completion of the course each participant will have the tools and knowledge to assist the department in the planning, development, and funding of grant-related programs and projects.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Define the components of a basic grant proposal.

  2. Identify the major types of grant funders for drug-related grant funding.

  3. Understand the strategic planning behind successful grant funding.

  4. Demonstrate the ability to read and understand the different types of funding announcements.

  5. Locate funders’ information via the Internet, catalogs, and directories.

  6. Explain how grant writing is a part of an overall fund development strategy for program devel- opment and sustainability.

Prerequisites:

  1. Students should bring a current project idea for grant funding or a current funding announcement.

  2. Students should bring the fact sheet (completed prior to the course), and any history or cur- rent information about their organization they think will be needed.

  3. Each student should have basic computer skills in word processing using Microsoft Office.

  4. This course is designed to meet the needs of a beginner in grant writing through enhancing the skills of a student with experience.

Course Length: 3 days/24 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Corrections, Military, Law Enforcement Support, Community-Based Organizations.


FIRE ARMS TRAINING SIMULATOR (FATS)

This military-led course uses the FATS system, a state-of-the-art virtual training solution, to provide marksmanship and judgment training with realistic and powerful scenarios for individual and col- lective training, supporting a full range of handguns and rifles (NCTC uses Glock 7, M-4, Pepper Spray, and Taser).

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Respond to shoot/no shoot scenarios with enhanced judgment and decision-making skills.

  2. Perform on the job with improved marksmanship.

  3. Demonstrate strengthened verbal commands.

  4. Apply situational awareness. Prerequisites: None. Course Length: 1 day/8 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Corrections, Military.


INDOOR MARIJUANA INVESTIGATIONS

This course is designed to equip investigating officers and support personnel with the training necessary to detect, search and seize, prosecute, and testify in indoor marijuana grow cases. Covered in this class will be an in-depth study of cannabis horticulture, the equipment required to grow indoors, and indoor growing techniques, including sensimilla cultivation and carbon dioxide enrichment. Methods to locate and investigate indoor grows will be discussed in depth. Search warrants, thermal imaging, scene search and seizure, and court testimony are also included. A number of case studies and investigations will be examined and critiqued.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe where marijuana fits in American society.

  2. Describe the basics of cannabis horticulture.

  3. Describe and testify how marijuana is cultivated in its natural environment outdoors.

  4. Describe and testify how cannabis is cultivated indoors.

  5. Recognize and recite what equipment is required to cultivate marijuana indoors.

  6. Conduct an indoor marijuana cultivation case from start to finish.

  7. Conduct intelligence work-ups on suspects and suspected sites.

  8. Conduct surveillance on grow sites.

  9. Describe the surveillance observations and what “probable cause” is.

  10. Contact utility companies to obtain electrical and water records at suspected sites.

  11. Analyze electrical and water records and describe what “probable cause” is.

  12. Prepare and swear indoor marijuana grow investigations search warrants.

  13. Prepare a raid plan incorporating officer safety issue.

  14. Conduct indoor marijuana grow investigation raid safely.

  15. Collect and preserve search and seize evidence to be entered into the chain of custody.

  16. Recognize and describe the two methods of indoor cultivation, 2nd Stage vs. 3rd Stage.

  17. Estimate approximate yields and calculate profit potential of the operation.

  18. Testify in indoor grow operation cases. Prerequisites: None. Course Length: 2 days/16 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Corrections, Military.


INDOOR MARIJUANA OFFICER SAFETY

This course is designed to teach or recertify investigating officers and support personnel to safely enter and dismantle indoor marijuana grow operations. Class attendees will be provided with an Advanced Indoor Marijuana Grow Training Manual on CD.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Understand how indoor marijuana grow operations are set up and operated.

  2. Recognize the safety hazards at indoor marijuana grow sites.

  3. Prepare raid plans.

  4. Prepare entry plans.

  5. Identify what safety equipment is required for a dismantling of a marijuana grow operation.

  6. Identify safety hazards.

  7. Execute and safely dismantle indoor grow operations and develop department policy for of- ficer safety in these cases.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 2 days/16 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Corrections, Military.


INTELLIGENCE FUNDAMENTALS AND ANALYSIS

This course is a beginner’s intelligence and analysis course for homeland security and law en- forcement professionals. Students will learn the process of intelligence analysis, as well as several analytical techniques and procedures designed to assist in applying intelligence-driven products at the local, state, and federal levels. Through dynamic classroom instruction and practical exercises, students will develop an understanding of intelligence analysis and be able to create end-state intelligence products depicting intelligence information necessary to conduct operations.

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Understand the difference between information and intelligence while applying the rules of 28 CFR part 23.

  2. Identify and apply the basics of the Intelligence Cycle.

  3. Conduct planning and direction activities as part of the Intelligence Cycle.

  4. Demonstrate the ability to conduct information collection and intelligence research.

  5. Apply the basics of information processing and document and media exploitation.

  6. Understand the analysis and production activities as they apply to the Intelligence Cycle.

  7. Demonstrate the ability to analyze and perform link analysis.

  8. Demonstrate the ability to perform flow chart analysis.

  9. Demonstrate the ability to conduct financial analysis of an individual or business.

  10. Demonstrate the ability to conduct telephone tolls analysis.

  11. Integrate intelligence analysis and products to provide case support and disseminate information.

  12. Explain the purpose of evaluation and feedback.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 3 days/24 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Law Enforcement Support.


INTELLIGENCE LEADER

This course is designed to ensure the intelligence functions of an organization operate in accor- dance with the agency’s policies and intelligence collection requirements. The intelligence leader also involves managing the accountability for the function of intelligence processes, ensuring the intelligence structure of the organization is organized and staffed with properly trained and skilled personnel, and ensuring there are adequate resources for producing intelligence/knowledge products.

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the basics of intelligence and analysis.

  2. Discuss the intelligence process.

  3. Identify legal issues and policies governing intelligence.

  4. Examine the Role & Training of the Criminal Intelligence Analyst.

  5. Connect Establishing & Managing a Criminal Intelligence Unit/Function.

  6. Participate in Criminal Intelligence Function/Unit Capstone Exercise.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 2 days/16 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, LEA Support.


INTELLIGENCE MANAGER

This course is designed to enhance management and leadership skills when supervising subordi- nates engage in operational intelligence functions. This course provides knowledge and training for managers recently promoted or transferred to intelligence units or drug task forces. It is intended to provide newly assigned managers with an understanding of the intelligence function in law enforcement, the effective organization and management of intelligence investigations by field officers, and the development of leadership skills for successful unit and/or task force opera- tions. Instruction will address the components of the intelligence function and cycle, legal and administrative issues unique to intelligence operations, intelligence subject selection, investigator development and accountability, risk analysis, informant use, and multi-agency issues.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Understand legal requirements unique to the intelligence function vs. the narcotics investigative function.

  2. Differentiate between tactical and strategic aspects of both the operational and analytical components in the law enforcement intelligence function.

  3. Understand the differences between investigative vs. intelligence unit functions with regards to unit direction, activities, and productivity measurement.

  4. Recognize the various methods employed in operational intelligence gathering with regards to information management, surveillance, informant use, and undercover assimilation.

  5. Recognize the risk inherent to undercover operations and gain exposure to risk analysis/man- agement practices.

  6. Understand the importance of facilitating clear and effective communication within the intel- ligence unit/task-force.

  7. Understand the role the supervisor plays in effective communication with line investigative units and command staff members in support of investigative and intelligence functions.

  8. Prepare an outline and conduct a briefing on an intelligence subject.

Prerequisites: None. Course Length: 3 days/24 hours. Who May Attend: Law Enforcement.


INTELLIGENCE PREPARATION OF THE OPERATIONAL ENVIRONMENT (IPOE)

This military-led course is designed to educate homeland security and law enforcement profession- als on the military process known as IPOE. Students will learn how this process may be adopted and/or modified to suit civilian intelligence operations at the local, state, and federal levels.

Furthermore, understanding of the military’s process and capabilities may facilitate requests for and success during joint operations. Through dynamic instruction, discussion, case study, and practical exercises, students will develop methods to effectively incorporate collected intelligence during operations and share information across agency, state, and military lines.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify and describe the three levels of intelligence, and the difference between intelligence disciplines.

  2. Define the operational environment.

  3. Describe environmental effects on operations.

  4. Evaluate the threat.

  5. Determine the threat courses of action.

  6. Demonstrate intelligence preparation of the operational environment through practical exercise.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 3 days/24 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Corrections, Military.


INTERVIEW AND INTERROGATION IN NARCOTICS CASES

This course is designed specifically for law enforcement officers. The focus of this training is to prepare investigators to conduct court-preferred methods of interviewing and interrogation tech- niques by incorporating non-verbal and behavioral analysis (body language) as well as grammati- cal clues to support truth and deception.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the 10 most common mistakes oftentimes made by investigators.

  2. Describe the differences between an interview and interrogation.

  3. Describe the “fight vs. flight” syndrome and its effects on behavioral analysis.

  4. Perform analysis on verbal and written statements.

  5. Prepare a list of “open” and “closed ended” questions.

  6. Describe the cause and affects of the “false positive” and how to avoid same.

  7. Recognize the “evasive verbal response” and its affective antidote.

  8. Repeat the three mandated questions of the “verbal lie detector.”

  9. Perform the mathematical equation of balancing a written statement.

  10. Describe the importance of allowing suspects to maintain their dignity.

  11. Conduct and describe the 12 steps of an interrogation.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 3 days/24 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Corrections.


INTERVIEW AND INTERROGATION IN NARCOTIC CASES (ADVANCED)

This course is designed to complement and enhance the NCTC Behavioral Analysis/Interroga- tion training initiative. This course relies on participant interaction with peers and role-players to simulate the techniques and practices presented by the instructor. Students will be critiqued and analyzed through video-taped role-playing scenarios.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Review and confirm the information (vocabulary, techniques, processes, etc.) from Interview and Interrogation.

  2. Use neuro-linguistic/eye assessment training to determine what primary representational system an individual uses during everyday interactions with others as well as determination of eidetic and/or creative assessment into their long-term memories.

  3. Understand the historical background for neuro-linguistic/eye assessment training as well as the practical application regarding law enforcement interactions and its use during the inter- view and interrogation milieu.

  4. Improve methods of approach and investigative development.

Prerequisite: NCTC Certificate of Completion for Interview and Interrogation.

Course Length: 3 days/24 hours.

Who May Attend: Law/Code Enforcement, Corrections, Military (SF and MP only). Excep- tions (I7I-115SFS [WI] Authorized).


INTRODUCTION TO NARCO-TERRORISM

This course will expose the narcotics nexus to all forms of terrorist organizations and how they affect the United States as well as foreign terrorist organizations threatening within our borders. A recommended proactive approach to terrorism investigations in all communities will be illustrated with an emphasis on drug-related issues. These tactics can be carried out by any law enforce- ment officer and will be successful in the fight against terrorism affecting the United States on the mainland. Foreign terrorist organizations such as ISIS, Al Qaeda, Hamas, Hezbollah, and FARC; domestic terrorist organizations; and localized (U.S.) narco-terrorists will be discussed. Identify- ing and investigating terrorist cells in the United States is a main focus of this course and every type of U.S. law enforcement officer will be shown how to use these methods in the fight against terrorism within our borders.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the nexus between terrorism and narcotics within their jurisdictions.

  2. Discuss the history and current threat by terrorists, especially Al Qaeda, against the U.S.

  3. Discuss the potential danger of terrorism on U.S. soil.

  4. Identify, interdict, and investigate terror cells in their respective jurisdictions.

  5. Identify and determine the current threat of terrorism in their jurisdictions.

  6. Increase the hardening of potential of local soft targets.

  7. Initiate an investigation to uncover such threats, funding operations, and lone wolves.

  8. Identify terrorist plots within their own jurisdictions and establish a local mechanism for weed- ing out such plots.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 3 days/24 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Corrections, Military.


LAW ENFORCEMENT INTELLIGENCE–BASIC

This course provides attendees with a more broad-based view of the multiple, inter-related skills and techniques used for transforming narcotics data into useful work products. The course uses the “Intelligence Cycle” to systematically process data from raw, unrelated information into “actionable” end products that provide a clearer understanding of the problems faced by police agencies today. In other words, students learn how to effectively connect the dots! This course of- fers a blend of “old school” tips, techniques, and methodology combined with some of the most advanced, comprehensive tools and resources available to the police industry. Uniform officers can immediately put aspects of the course to work as effectively as detectives or criminal ana- lysts. The “Intelligence Cycle” is introduced early in the course and is used throughout the course in a practical case-development project that requires them to apply their newfound knowledge.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Discuss the latest drug trends, prices, and market shifts; the background and ideology of many of the more active extremist groups; and identify the characteristics, criminal proclivities, and idiosyncrasies of the most prevalent evolving and/or emerging ethnic criminal organization in their region.

  2. Provide a clear and concise definition of “intelligence” and discuss its “value” within the framework of policing.

  3. Differentiate between “military” and “criminal” intelligence.

  4. Describe the components of “Intelligence Cycle” and explain the product of cooperative interactions.

  5. Describe the function of each of the four applications of intelligence.

  6. Discuss the fundamental benefits of developing a collection “hypothesis” and “plan” and draft hypothetical examples.

  7. List a number of the more common sources of information and collection techniques.

  8. Describe and demonstrate the five graphic management techniques.

  9. Discuss the varied terminology inherent in telephone communication records and its benefits.

  10. Identify analytic products, discuss their function, and list a number of “variables” to be examined.

  11. Demonstrate, in writing, an ability to identify the “relationships and commonalities” of data within the analytical case scenario.

  12. Discuss the relevant issues regarding public records request and list a few of the legally-mandated exceptions to their release, in addition to the records management security and retention guidelines.

  13. List three fundamental steps for preserving collected data.

  14. Demonstrate familiarity with and proper applications of the demonstrated equipment and additionally be able to list five “tips” for enhancing the quality of body-worn transmission as well as three techniques for mounting a successful stationary video surveillance.

  15. Discuss some of the benefits of Internet research and describe a number of available online resources which may be used in support of an investigation or intelligence project.

  16. Describe four collation techniques and describe the value/benefit of the process with respect to case management.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 3 days/24 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Corrections, Military (Intel, SF, and MP only).


LEAD AND SEED STARTUP

This military-led training affects individual change, in an effort to transform individual adolescent knowledge, attitude, and skills. During the instruction, participants explore the specific causes and solutions for underage drinking, teen tobacco use, or drugs in their community. The newly- trained team will select strategies and activities that they believe will work where they live, work, and play. Their selected activities will yield environmental outcomes and will make changes in local policy, practices, and procedures.

Upon successful completion of the course, attendees will be able to:

  1. Produce a logic model and action plans.

  2. Identify the differences between policies, practices, and procedures.

  3. Localize and take charge of their efforts and outcomes.

  4. Identify and engage with community stakeholders.

Prerequisites: Youth and adults who are committed to at least a one-year term with the coalition.

Course Length: 2 days/15 hours.

Who May Attend: Coalition members, community organizations, educators, counselors, social workers.


LEADING AND MANAGING THE DRUG TASK FORCE UNIT

This course is a high-energy, 40-hour course focusing on the first-line supervisor and mid-manag- er. It introduces The Leadership Test©, The Seven Layers of Success©, and the DISC© as tools that will improve the skills and abilities of supervisors and managers to both manage and lead within the drug task force unit. There is an emphasis on defining the difference between leadership and management and identifying their separate skill sets and exercises to apply that to day-to-day role. Tools are provided that will assist participants to work more effectively as developers within their units of both individuals as well as their respective teams.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Define paradigms and paradigm shifts related to their role as a leader of people.

  2. Accept responsibility for their personal leadership development.

  3. Influence the value and belief system of those they lead.

  4. Distinguish leadership, management, leader, and manager roles within the drug task force unit.

  5. Describe how the “Leadership Test” will improve the decision-making process as both a leader and manager.

  6. Use the DISC© tool to assess communication and management styles as well as predict and assign productive teams.

  7. Identify when intervention is needed and provide corrective strategies for group behavior.

  8. Use the DISC© to better understand and solve relationship or productivity problems.

  9. Establish the absolute dependent relationship between liability management and quality super- vision while explaining the relationship of managers and supervisors to each component of the Seven Layers of Success©.

  10. Explain the importance of leadership to implement the Seven Layers of Success© and liability defense.

  11. Identify the four reasons narcotic officers fail in their operational performance.

  12. Illustrate how The Seven Layers of Success© will minimize the four reasons for failure.

  13. Explain the importance of policy and procedure to the narcotic officer’s performance.

  14. Provide a means for narcotics supervisors to assess a properly written policy and procedure.

  15. Describe the importance of training to successful performance for individual narcotics officer and drug task force team.

  16. Define and explain the concept of “Training in Context” for the narcotics officer.

  17. Demonstrate an understanding of the history of law enforcement liability.

  18. Explain how the plaintiff attacks on five separate fronts probing for specific weaknesses while historically we have only prepared for one front.

  19. Explain how the Seven Layers of Success© acts as a defense against a plaintiff’s Five Front Attack against the narcotics officer and narcotics unit.

  20. Discuss a means of evaluating narcotics officers actions for potential seriousness of liability.

  21. Explain the Leadership Test© and the George Patton and Sam Walton Defense as a means of thwarting “The Lawyer’s Lie” that it is always “cheaper to settle.”

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 5 days/40 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Corrections, Military.


MANAGING NARCOTICS INFORMANTS

This course instructs new and experienced officers in the efficient, safe, and legal protocols for developing, managing, and deploying confidential informants in narcotics cases. Officers will be taught to identify and avoid potential “problem” informants and integrity issues. Developing and using a variety of informants, such as informants working off a new arrest, a sentence reduction, jail and prison inmates, probationers, parolees, paid informants, other officers’ informants, and other categories, will be covered in this class. Briefing, debriefing, and interviewing informants will be instructed. The registration process, cooperation letters, informant contracts, payment paperwork, informant testimony, and other topics will be covered in this class. Officer safety, informant safety, and informant integrity will be emphasized.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Distinguish between informants, confidential informants, and sources of information.

  2. Understand the value of using confidential informants and their use in narcotics investigations.

  3. Identify potential informants who may have information about their jurisdiction.

  4. Cultivate informants.

  5. Deploy informants during narcotics investigations.

  6. Develop tactical operation plans for informant-involved operations.

  7. Properly manage confidential informants, funding, and buy money.

  8. Use informants for the introduction of undercover officers and during “controlled buys.”

  9. Insulate the informant from suspicion by the subject of a drug investigation.

  10. Corroborate informant information and activities.

  11. Develop an efficient and legal confidential informant registration process and “work contract.”

  12. Avoid potential problems that may arise when using confidential informants.

  13. Effectively deal with prosecution considerations when using informants.

  14. Protect the integrity of tactical operations and investigations involving informants.

  15. Increase overall officer safety during operations and protect confidential information.

Prerequisites: None Course Length: 3 days/24 hours Who May Attend: Law Enforcement


METHAMPHETAMINE CLANDESTINE LAB SAFETY

This course is designed to meet the regulatory requirements of 29 CFR 1910.120 and/or 40 CFR 311. Students are taught the basic health and safety issues involved in the management of dismantling and processing of clandestine laboratories. Students will learn how to evaluate the

physical and chemical hazards of wastes produced during meth production through either hydri- odic acid red phosphorous (HI red P) or metal ephedrine reduction (either lithium or sodium). Field exercises focus on using specialized equipment, such as combustible gas indicators, photo ionization detectors, and colorimetric indicator tubes, to monitor for hazards before entering the site. Participants get basic training in chemistry and toxicology, with practical lab sessions geared toward understanding safety concerns. Students learn how to put together a site-specific health and safety plan, select and use the proper personal protective equipment (PPE), and conduct de- contamination. In field exercises, guidance is provided on how to wear and operate air purifying respiratory (APR), self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA), and the appropriate PPE.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the regulatory requirements associated with working on hazardous material site.

  2. Identify the type of lab and the associated hazards based upon one or more of the following: Precursors used, lab set-up, hardware/apparatus present, aid monitoring instrumentation read- ings, and case-related intelligence.

  3. List specific administrative controls that their agency must do to meet federal regulations.

  4. Select specific air monitoring instrumentation for each lab type and demonstrate operational knowledge of basic air monitoring equipment.

  5. Identify the components of, develop, and write a site-specific safety plan before entry.

  6. List chemical-related “action levels” for each lab entry, based upon the level of protection (PPE) that the entry team is wearing.

  7. Demonstrate the knowledge and motor skills to inspect, clean, and wear an APR and SCBA.

  8. List the components of a medical surveillance program.

  9. Identify the evidence that needs to be sampled at labs and the steps to break down the labs for proper disposal based on chemical hazard class and RCRA guidance.

  10. Cook meth using one of the selected methods to re-enforce the cognitive knowledge and provide individual experience.

Prerequisites: Upon receipt of official student selection confirmation letter from NCTC, the student will be required to obtain a medical certification signed by a physician. Legitimate job assignment where there is a need for the informa- tion, with no intent to misuse the information or to produce illegal drugs.

Course Length: 5 days/40 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Corrections.


MEXICAN DRUG CARTEL INVESTIGATIONS

Mexican drug trafficking organizations are impacting communities in nearly every city in the United States. In 2011, Mexican drug cartels operated in 39 states across the country. This problem can no longer be viewed as a “border issue.” The majority of the drugs distributed and consumed in the U.S. originate in Mexico. In an effort to aggressively target drug trafficking or- ganization, law enforcement officials need to understand how the Mexican drug war impacts local cities in the U.S. on a daily basis. The drug cartel leaders have strategically formed relationships with American gangs to flood our communities with illicit drugs. This relationship has caused great concern for law enforcement agencies in the U.S. It is imperative that law enforcement officials gain a true understanding of the “Mexican Cartel & American Street Gang Connection.” This course does not focus on statistical data or other information easily obtained through online searches regarding Mexican drug cartels. The information presented is based on the instruc-

tor’s unique experience in conducting long-term undercover operations, wire-tap intercepts, and

debriefings of suspects directly linked to various Mexican drug cartels. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Recognize U.S.-based cartel structure and regional controls.

  2. Apply investigative procedures to solve “hits” in American cities.

  3. Recognize Mexican drug cartel/American Hispanic street gang connections.

  4. Recognize patterns used by street gangs under the direction of Mexican drug cartels.

  5. Recognize the “Drug Trafficking Pyramid” from street level to supply source.

  6. Recognize cartel bribery methods and counter-surveillance techniques.

  7. Perform financial investigations to dismantle an operation.

  8. Identify smuggling routes, phony fronts, and concealment methods.

  9. Recognize different levels of informants and the benefits of wire taps.

  10. Identify safety concerns of undercover operations and various infiltration techniques.

  11. Present investigations to grand juries for prosecution.

  12. Identify violent encounters between cartels and U.S. law enforcement.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 3 days/24 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Corrections, Military (Intel only).


 

MEXICAN DRUG CARTELS

This training course will provide law enforcement officers with the knowledge and skills to ef- fectively identify and disrupt Mexican Drug Trafficking Organizations (MDTO) operating within their jurisdictions. The course content is based on the instructor’s experience in conducting

long-term criminal investigations involving murders for hire, state/federal narcotics investigations, wire intercepts, and hundreds of hours of interviews of cartel assassins (scenarios), victims, and associates.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Discuss the history of Mexican drug cartels and the relationship with other cartels.

  2. Discuss Mexican authorities’ efforts to curtail the cartels.

  3. Describe operations and the types and quantities of drugs smuggled across the border.

  4. Explain smuggling methods used and U.S. efforts to combat drug cartels.

  5. Locate commonly-used operation hubs and U.S. routes and corridors.

  6. Recognize cartel relationships with gangs, money laundering, and gun smuggling.

  7. Gather data, develop strategies, formulate plans, and network with other LE agencies to com- bat drug cartel activity in local jurisdictions.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 2 days/16 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Corrections, Military (Intel only).


MIDDLE EASTERN INTELLIGENCE

This course will familiarize homeland defenders and deploying professionals with the history of the Middle East. The focus of the course is on Islam as a religion and a way of life. Students will gain a better understanding of the depth and intensity of religiously-motivated terrorism and its impact on homeland security and nation-building efforts. The course will also link how drug trafficking operations support terrorism operations.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. List the various groups, with respect to ethnicity, religion, language, and nation, of the Middle Eastern descent residing in the United States and discuss the cultural fault lines between these groups.

  2. Describe the influence of Arab culture on the ethics of Muslims today.

  3. Compare and contrast Arab and American cultural values.

  4. Describe legendary Arab physiognomic powers.

  5. Describe Arab belief system before Islam and the creation and foundation of Islam.

  6. Discuss the set of religious beliefs and practices of Muslims.

  7. Describe the impact of the concept of Jihad on the life of Muslims today.

  8. Compare and contrast the ethics of martyrdom, suicide terror, and Jihad terrorism.

  9. Discuss the history of the Islamic Empires and cultural impact on militant Islam today.

  10. Discuss the cultural renaissance of the Islamic Empires and its cultural impact on militant Islam.

  11. Discuss the political legacy of the Islamic Empires and its political impact on militant Islam.

  12. Describe the relationship of the various sectarian groups within Islam and Islam in America.

  13. List the various agencies of the U.S. foreign intelligence community.

  14. Describe the intelligence production cycle.

  15. Discuss the utility of intelligence sources and methods in the fight against terrorism.

  16. Describe the intelligence security classification system and its impact on anti terror efforts.

  17. Discuss basic definitions and forms of the Arabic language used today.

  18. Identify aspects of Arabic alphabet, word structure, and soft vowels with direct impact on transliteration of Arabic names.

  19. Decipher Arabic names, including compound and nicknames, to identify affiliations with respect to ethnicity; religion or sect; and national, regional, and colonial traditions.

  20. Demonstrate good cop/bad cop behavior in the context of Arab/Islam cultural norms.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 3 days/24 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Military (Intel only).


MILITARY DECISION-MAKING PROCESS (MDMP)

This military-led course is designed to educate homeland security and law enforcement profes- sionals on the military process known as the MDMP. Students will learn how this process may be adopted and or modified to suit civilian intelligence operations at the local, state, and federal

levels. Furthermore, understanding of the military’s process and capabilities may facilitate requests for and success during joint operations. Through dynamic instruction, discussion, case study, and practical exercises, students will develop methods to effectively incorporate analysis and courses of action into operational planning.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the steps of the MDMP.

  2. Define commander’s intent and commander’s role in the MDMP.

  3. Define the staff’s role in the MDMP.

  4. Define Critical Information Requirements (CIRs).

  5. Identify and define the qualities/criteria for courses of action.

  6. Explain how Intelligence Preparation of the Battlefield/Operational Environment (IPB/IPOE) is integrated into the decision-making process.

  7. Identify Operations Security (OPSEC), Communications Security (COMSEC), and Information Security (INFOSEC) considerations.

  8. Develop course of action matrices, statements, and sketches.

  9. Explain the process and significance of “War-Gaming.”

  10. Explain how to abbreviate the MDMP in a time-constrained environment.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 3 days/24 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Military.


MONEY LAUNDERING

This course provides students with the principles and techniques available in conducting money- laundering investigations as they pertain to illegal narcotic activities. A practical, interactive exer- cise is scattered throughout the course. The interactive exercise involves specific case scenarios that would allow the students to apply the techniques for financial interviewing, identifying sources of financial information, using indirect methods of proving profitability in illegal drug trafficking enterprises, using financial undercover operations, financial search warrants, and conducting money laundering investigations.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Recognize elements of the various financial crimes that stem from the laundering and accumu- lation of profits from the illegal narcotics industry.

  2. Use techniques that can be employed parallel to a normal drug investigation and used to supplement any ongoing criminal investigation/prosecution to solve open cases and identify future investigations.

  3. Determine if money laundering and currency violations can assist officers in expanding their prosecution base through adding targets.

  4. Determine whether provisions of the asset forfeiture are appropriate.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 3 days/24 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Law Enforcement Support.


NARCOTICS ENFORCEMENT AND TRAFFICKING INVESTIGATIONS IN HOTELS/MOTELS AND PARCEL/FREIGHT CARRIERS

This course focuses on hotel/motel and parcel/freight interdiction and provides an update on legal and constitutional issues related to each interdiction technique. Students will identify each of the seven exceptions to the search warrant rule with emphasis upon stop & frisk, search incident to arrest, probable cause, plain view, plain feel, inventory, and consent. The class will express a working knowledge of the parcel and freight carrier system and the labeling practices for each.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. List reasons why parcel carriers are used by the criminal element to ship narcotics and monies.

  2. List and identify some of the patron saints of the “drug underworld” and their impact on narcotics enforcement.

  3. Identify the test used by the courts to justify the length of an investigative detention.

  4. Identify how trash searches of abandoned property can be used.

  5. Identify how audio or video recordings can be used in hotel/motel interdiction.

  6. Identify how a post-eviction search of a hotel room can be an effective tool.

  7. Identify the method(s) for using a canine to sniff packages in a parcel or freight carrier facility that comply with Fourth Amendment standards.

  8. List each of the two different theories on how to start a hotel and motel interdiction unit.

  9. Express four steps on how to conduct an investigation related to hotel/motel interdiction.

  10. Identify indicators of narcotic activities that can be used by hotel/motel employees to deter- mine if an individual may be engaged in suspicious activity related to drug trafficking behavior.

  11. 11. List the techniques to establish a working relationship with parcel or freight carriers.

  12. Identify indicators that can be used by law enforcement personnel to determine if packages or parcels may contain narcotics.

  13. Identify each of the nine steps that should be conducted to ensure a successful and profes- sional “controlled delivery” of the suspected package to its destination.

  14. Identify how to work alternate locations, such as mail boxes, U Box, We Ship, and The Box Place.

Prerequisites: Must be law enforcement officers or narcotics enforcement agents.

Course Length: 2 days/16 hours

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement


NATIONAL GUARD SUBSTANCE ABUSE TRAINING (NGB)

This military-led training focuses on educating service members about the dangers of drug and alcohol abuse, current drug trends, updates to the AR 600-85, urinalysis testing, and resources for substance abuse treatment and detoxification. Service members gain a clear understanding about the Army Substance Abuse Program and how to seek assistance for addiction and/or depen- dence. Self/Command Referrals options are discussed to educate service members and com- manders about the process, regulations, and individual rights outlined in the Army regulations.

The training can be customized by the unit commander to meet his/her intent. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Recognize the dangers associated with the abuse of narcotics, prescription drugs, synthetic/ designer drugs, and alcohol.

  2. Identify the current substance abuse/misuse trends facing Soldiers in the Pennsylvania Na- tional Guard.

  3. Use the Army substance abuse regulation to reference command actions, individual rights, separation proceedings, and treatment procedures.

  4. Identify the resources available to assist service members and family members seeking treat- ment/detoxification for drug and or alcohol abuse.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 2 hours.

Who May Attend: PA Army National Guard.


NATIONAL PLANNERS’ COURSE

The purpose of this military-led course is to educate the community within the federal, state, lo- cal, and tribal governments that combat transnational organized crime on a standardized national plan development process based on planning fundamentals that are consistent with national plan- ning standards contained in the Federal Plan Development Process.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. While working in teams, apply the five phases of the standardized Federal Plan Development Process.

  2. Apply knowledge and skills to counter-narcotics planning or operations responsibilities that they perform on the job.

  3. Use planning efforts to assist in drug supply reduction.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 5 days/40 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Corrections, Military.


NCTC POLYGRAPH PROGRAM

This course provides American Polygraph Association-accredited training in the field of forensic psychophysiology using polygraph techniques. The course provides current state-of-the-art training by practicing professionals and researchers in the forensic psychophysiological detection of decep- tion field. The course is recognized by the American Association of Police Polygraphists and the National Polygraph Association, and exceeds the standards of the American Society for Testing and Materials.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an in-depth knowledge of the field of forensic psychophysiological detection of deception.

  2. Use the latest major polygraph techniques being taught and used in the profession, particularly in the areas of drug/narcotics investigation, asset forfeiture testing, and testing to identify potential terrorists and prevent terrorist activities.

  3. Use state-of-the-art computerized polygraph instrumentation.

  4. Use test data analysis techniques, particularly in the area of identification of sophisticated use of countermeasures and the application of anti- and counter-countermeasure procedures.

  5. Use basic and advanced information and practice in productive communication, interviewing, and interrogation methods.

  6. Conduct a professional and ethical forensic psychophysiological detection of deception exam.

  7. Perform in both an academic setting and as a practicing law enforcement polygraphist.

Prerequisites:

Must be a sworn law enforcement officer and sponsored by your agency; no criminal convic- tions for any moral turpitude crimes or any crimes above a summary/petty offense level; knowledge and proficiency with Windows computer operating system; five years of full-time street or criminal investigative experience with a public law enforcement agency or military police unit. Additionally, students must have successfully completed 60 college credits from a state/government-licensed institution (not including developmental courses)—official tran- scripts required. With less than 60 credits or five years’ experience, applicants will be evalu- ated by the selection board using 45 clock hours of documented, formal, law enforcement classroom training to equate one three-credit college course, with 900 clock hours required to equate to 60 college credits.

Course Length: 12 weeks/480 hours.

Internship:

An internship [Cooperative Education CFR21.4233(a)] will be required for final graduation

and certification of the participant. The internship [Cooperative Education CFR21.4233(a)]

will require the completion of a minimum of 30 polygraph examinations within a 12-month period following the academic phase of the program, regardless of any state licensing require- ments. This would be completed during your regular employment as a polygraphist with your law enforcement agency. The internship [Cooperative Education CFR21.4233(a)] must be completed through NCTC to receive certification even if an internship [Cooperative Education CFR21.4233(a)] is required for state licensing. They may run concurrently.

Who May Attend: Law enforcement officers assigned to drug law enforcement, intelligence gathering, and/or investigation and suppression of terrorist activities.


OUTLAW MOTORCYCLE GANGS AND THE NARCOTICS CONNECTION

This course presents an historical perspective of early motorcycle clubs and their evolvement into today’s traditional outlaw motorcycle gangs (OMG). The historical perspective will continue with a discussion of each of the major groups. In addition, the students will be exposed to the current status of a large portion of clubs who operate in the northeast as well as a nationwide perspec-

tive. The class will also address specifics detailing gang membership and associates, identification, investigative techniques, involvement in drug trafficking, officer safety, weapons, criminal activi- ties, gang intimidation techniques, key words and phrases, the recruitment and usage of confiden- tial informants, current gang intelligence/trends, and a review and discussion of possible future gang activities and the link to narcotics financing tjhe operational component of the gang.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify OMGs and gang members from indicators, including tattoos, colors, key words, ab- breviations, and slogans.

  2. Understand the history of OMGs in the United States and appreciate how this knowledge can be used to law enforcement’s advantage.

  3. Display a working knowledge of OMG narcotics investigations.

  4. Understand the techniques necessary to successfully recruit confidential informants within the gang.

  5. Discuss the importance of officer safety when dealing with members of OMGs from both an investigative and a patrol perspective.

  6. Understand the necessity of information sharing and intelligence gathering as it relates to potential investigative activities targeting OMGs.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 2 days/16 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Military Intelligence.


PHARMACEUTICAL/PRESCRIPTION DRUG INVESTIGATIONS

This course introduces law enforcement members to the specific issues unique to drug diversion cases. Students will learn the roles of the various players in a drug diversion investigation includ- ing the federal government (DEA and FDA), the particular state enforcement agencies, insur- ance fraud units, private health care companies, pharmaceutical companies, and local or county

aspects, including the coroner’s office. This course will provide a resource base, strategies, and step-by-step guidelines for the law enforcement officer who wants to expand into the area of pharmaceutical drug diversion investigations. Topics covered include drug identification, doctor shopping, forged prescriptions, diversion in a hospital or medical facility, and overprescribing cases. Students will be exposed to multi-media presentations, hands-on aspects of cases, hospital security features, and sophisticated case solving exercises.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Understand the policy, law enforcement, industry, and professional landscape of drug diversion in the United States.

  2. Determine whether a factual circumstance involves a diversion issue.

  3. Understand if there is a case, whether the investigation requires assistance from other agencies or private industry.

  4. Discover where to obtain evidence for a diversion case.

  5. Avoid privacy issues and HIPAA litigation.

  6. Prepare an investigative action plan.

  7. Understand the distinction between a possession and intent to deliver prescription drug case.

  8. Communicate with healthcare facilities during an investigation.

  9. Supervise a diversion investigation for an agency.

  10. Locate and properly select an expert.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 2 days/16 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement


PHYSICAL SURVEILLANCE

This course focuses on the categories of physical surveillance, surveillance terminology, equip- ment, and skills. It addresses conducting surveillance on drug traffickers, circumventing counter- surveillance, identifying terrorist counter-surveillance, tactical operation plans, investigative reports, and preparing for surveillance and operation scratch reports. After the first day of lecture, students will understand the rules, terminology, and tactics, which will prepare them for surveillance operations.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. List preparations for assignments necessitating physical surveillance.

  2. Perform the skills necessary for conducting physical surveillance on subjects of investigations.

  3. List techniques to personally conduct safe physical surveillance subject(s).

  4. Identify counter-surveillance.

  5. Identify Al Qaeda-trained subjects.

  6. Discuss legal issues and legal restrictions associated with physical surveillance.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 5 days/40 hours.

Who May Attend: Law/Code Enforcement.


ROLE OF THE UNDERCOVER

This course trains new and experienced undercover officers to conduct safe and efficient under- cover narcotic operations and understand the roles and responsibilities of other team members. The course stresses how to conduct every undercover operation safely and efficiently. In addition to classroom instruction, the course includes many practical exercises.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Learn how to develop a cover story to establish credibility with the drug dealer.

  2. Negotiate a drug purchase.

  3. Purchase drugs in an undercover capacity.

  4. Perform undercover duties safely.

  5. Properly debrief a confidential informant after a controlled buy.

  6. Perform investigative duties pertaining to undercover assignments.

  7. Perform administrative duties pertaining to undercover assignments.

  8. Discuss and demonstrate the 14 Undercover Rules and Reminders for Survival.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 5 days/40 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement.


SENIOR POLYGRAPH EXAMINER

This course is specifically for experienced law enforcement Psychophysiological Detection of Deception examiners. The primary emphasis of the course will be on quality control, test data analysis, test question construction, and case review. The techniques that will be studied will include Law Enforcement Applicant Screening and Criminal Specific Testing.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Conduct three- and seven-position scoring for test data analysis.

  2. Properly construct test questions for screening and specific issue polygraph examinations.

  3. Perform proper quality control for polygraph.

  4. Conduct law enforcement applicant and specific issue polygraph examinations.

Prerequisites: State, Local, or Federal Government Polygraph Examiner Certified.

Course Length: 5 days/40 hours.

Who May Attend:State, Local, or Federal Government Polygraph Examiner Certified.

 


SOCIAL NETWORKING

There is a strong emphasis on the technology skills needed to conduct narcotics investigations. Those skills include tracking online communication and using online social networking portals (Snapchat, Facebook, Twitter, etc.) as investigative and analytical tools. Beginner and expe- rienced students will identify information available on various sites and explore the currently overlooked and underused value of integrating that information into criminal investigations and criminal intelligence analysis.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Be familiar with the operation of the largest sites, to include Myspace.com, Facebook.com, Instagram.com, Snapchat, Xanga.com, Myghetto.com, Photobucket.com, Flickr.com, Youtube. com, Stickam.com, Twitter.com, and LiveJournal.com, and other avenues such as Dodgeball, Helio, and AirG; Internet Relay Chat, Usenet, and fserve VIDoIP (Video over Internet Proto- col); bluesnarfing; and podslurping.

  2. Understand how narcotic traffickers use online social networks to interact, conceal their identi- ties, select victims, and conduct illegal drug activities.

  3. Know what information is available from social networking sites through subpoenas and warrants.

  4. Interpret email headers, identify ownership of Web sites, and locate Internet service providers.

  5. Identify current software tools available to law enforcement to investigate social networks, including tracking software.

  6. Develop and maintain undercover social network identities.

  7. Identify and safely seize digital storage media, computer storage devices, and mobile com- munication devices (i.e., smart phones).

  8. Practice preserving the publicly viewable portions of a suspect’s social networking site in a forensically sound manner.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 2 days/16 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Military Intelligence.


SPANISH FOR UNIFORMED PATROL AND DRUG INTERDICTION OFFICER PHASE I

This course places emphasis on drug terminology, field interrogations, executing arrests, and specialized Spanish vocabulary that indicates impending danger. Considerable attention is given to action scenarios and role-playing. In addition to Spanish language training, a special cross-culture component addresses the elimination of non-verbal communication barriers that will enhance officer safety and effectiveness when dealing with Spanish-speaking persons.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Use Spanish to identify and remove drivers and passengers from a vehicle, obtain consent to search the vehicle, safely search vehicle and suspects, locate drugs and paraphernalia, maintain control of suspects through voice commands, control bystanders, interpret body language mes- sages, use Spanish drug terminology, and recognize offensive Spanish words.

  2. Describe how the Spanish surname system works, what Latin American identity documents look like, how to identify Latin gang tags and tattoos, how to offer consular notification, and how to identify similarities and differences within Latino subsets.

  3. Describe basic Latino demographics and the primary differences between Latinos and non- Latinos.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 3 days/24 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Corrections.


SPANISH FOR UNIFORMED PATROL AND DRUG INTERDICTION OFFICER PHASE II

This course is a review and continuation of the course entitled “Spanish for the Uniformed Patrol and Drug Interdiction Officer Phase I.” It focuses on field interview and interrogation protocols, enabling officers and investigators to obtain critical information relevant to drug enforcement and investigations. This workshop prepares non-Hispanic officers to use Spanish to request and receive critical information concerning suspects, searches, and seizures associated with illegal drug activity.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Speak Spanish to ask for basic field information, including questions about names, birth dates, telephone numbers, addresses, ages, place of employment, country of origin, identity documents, location of persons, location of drugs and weapons, and ownership of vehicles.

  2. Use Spanish numbers to establish the time and date of an event.

  3. Mirandize in Spanish.

  4. Understand probable spoken Spanish responses to learned questions.

  5. Conduct basic field interviews in Spanish.

Prerequisites: Spanish for Uniformed Patrol and Drug Interdiction Officer Phase I or two years of college Spanish.

Course Length: 4 days/32 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Corrections.


STREET GANG NARCOTICS INVESTIGATIONS

This course explores the origins, history, current trends, identifiers, dynamics of street gangs, and gang involvement in the drug trade and distribution in the United States. This course will identify and examine numerous influential gangs by geographic location, threat level, specialty, and their interactions with each other. Jurisdictions will be discussed, identifying areas of operation both on the street and in correctional facilities across the country. The intent of this course is to prepare officers in both large and small agencies to properly identify and interdict gang activity in their respective jurisdictions, as well as understand and communicate the impact this activity may have on other jurisdictions and correctional facilities. Officers will learn how to use this inter-agency information network to combine efforts in combating street gangs.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the factors leading to gang membership.

  2. Relate to the individual gang member for the purpose of developing rapport, developing infor- mants, information, and inhibiting gang membership.

  3. Identify existing and emerging street gangs and their signs within the student’s respective jurisdiction.

  4. Describe and identify crimes relating to and committed by gangs in their own jurisdiction.

  5. Develop a synergistic team to combat gangs in their respective jurisdiction.

  6. Locate appropriate resources to assist in the endeavor to identify and combat gangs in the student’s respective jurisdiction.

  7. Interact with street gangs in a safer manner.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 3 days/24 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Corrections, Military.


TACTICAL ENTRY TO METHAMPHETAMINE LABORATORIES

This course is designed for law enforcement officers who are required to make entry and secure a methamphetamine lab prior to the assessment or processing. Classroom instruction includes types of methamphetamine labs, physical and chemical hazards associated with tactical response to methamphetamine labs, and respiratory protection. Raid planning and protective clothing

and equipment are also covered in the classroom. Scenario-based training follows classroom instruction. During scenario-based training, students will use protective equipment while execut- ing search warrants into suspected lab sites. Respiratory protection consisting of an air purifying respirator or a self-contained breathing apparatus will be used while clearing the house, along with simunition guns.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe different manufacturing methods.

  2. List how to assess, evaluate, and control the hazards associated with different lab types.

  3. Describe the health and safety issues with clandestine laboratory response.

  4. Discuss the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulatory issues associ- ated with clandestine laboratory response.

  5. Describe the use and limitations of respiratory protection.

  6. Describe decontamination techniques.

  7. Discuss the importance and application of raid planning.

  8. Define hard and soft entries.

  9. List sources of intelligence.

  10. Discuss fatal force issues specific to a methamphetamine lab entry.

  11. Use proper precautions when dealing with contaminated suspects/victims.

  12. Plan and execute a search warrant into a clandestine laboratory while using an air purifying respirator.

  13. Plan and execute a search warrant into a clandestine laboratory while using a self-contained breathing apparatus.

  14. Demonstrate proper planning and action for a flash fire while making entry into a meth lab.

  15. Demonstrate proper action when confronted with fatal force.

  16. Safely plan and execute a search warrant into a mock lab.

  17. Plan and safely execute a search warrant for tactical entry into a mock methamphetamine lab.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 4 days/32 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement.


TACTICAL MISSION PLANNING

This course is designed to provide an overview of Troop Leading Procedures and the Army Operations Order to officers of a law enforcement agency (LEA). This course covers the benefits of keeping a mission folder and all the supporting documents required by an LEA for Drug Search Warrant Operations, the benefits of a standardized mission brief, describes the difference between a report writing style and the directive style for writing orders, introduces the LEA to

the Army Operations Order format redesigned for the civil nature of police operations, introduces the LEA to Troop Leading Procedures and how they apply to the deliberate (search warrant) and hasty (call out) planning cycles, and covers planning considerations to identify all aspects of the given scenario in the civil environment. Upon completion of this course students will be able to better task organize for mission planning, organize information for future reference and briefing purposes, and integrate attached agencies into counterdrug operations.

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Recognize the importance of keeping a standardized mission folder.

  2. Summarize the importance of a using a standardized briefing format.

  3. Identify the format of the Operations Order.

  4. Recognize and apply the eight Troop Leading Procedures.

  5. Identify the need to list and identify all aspects of a given scenario to create a complete plan.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 3 days/24 hours (2.5 days classroom, .5 days practical exercise).

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement.


TACTICAL NARCOTICS DEBRIEFING

This course teaches all types of law enforcement officers from a variety of duty assignments to conduct effective debriefings of new arrestees, jailed prisoners, prison inmates, probationers, pa- rolees, and other individuals for the purpose of acquiring intelligence information and cultivating informants. This training course has been taught to, and used by, members of the NYPD Intelli- gence Division, Field Intelligence Officers (FIO), and hundreds of law enforcement officers within the 17 impact zones (high crime cities) throughout New York State with outstanding results and subsequent successes. It has resulted in the development of more counterdrug-related informants, terrorist-related informants, and “actionable” intelligence in these zones than ever before.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the intelligence needs of their respective jurisdiction.

  2. Conduct effective debriefings of arrestees, prisoners, inmates, and other offenders with an emphasis on narcotics, terrorist, and gang investigations.

  3. Conduct more successful debriefings of difficult individuals.

  4. Identify motivations leading to cooperation of potential informants.

  5. Use effective body language to increase communication.

  6. Phrase efficient questions to greatly increase the potential of acquiring intelligence.

  7. Use maximum elicitation communication techniques.

  8. Use conducive communicative behavior.

  9. Cultivate additional informants useful in combating drugs and other crimes within their jurisdiction.

  10. Develop considerably more “actionable” intelligence than before.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 3 days/24 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Corrections, Military (Intel, SF, MP only), Law Enforce- ment Support (Intel only).


TACTICS FOR NARCOTIC WARRANTS

This course focuses on the tactical techniques of high-risk warrant service. Through demonstra- tion and practical application, students use a high-risk entry facility to practice entry, search, and extraction techniques taught throughout the course from decision-making through warrant execution. Students will also learn vehicle stops involving narcotics, undercover extractions, and tactical team management.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Complete a high-risk narcotics vehicle stop using vehicles and techniques learned in class.

  2. Plan and conduct a warrant service briefing for a consensual or dynamic entry for the purpose of searching for and finding a perpetrator to serve a warrant.

  3. Perform the functions and duties of a team leader during the course of a consensual entry and a dynamic entry, using a team of seven to nine officers and entry equipment to search and extract one to three perpetrators from a building simulating living quarters, using entry equipment, simunitions, a bunker, and techniques learned in class.

  4. Students will properly learn how to use team placement and specialized equipment to effec- tively neutralize an armed perpetrator in closed quarters.

  5. Assume a tactical mindset as taught in class and use the principles in the decision-making process during the course of high-risk warrant execution scenarios.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 4 days/32 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Corrections, Military (SF/MP).


TECHNICAL SUPPORT

This course will provide students with the skills necessary to conduct operations using specific technical equipment. It will equip students with the ability to assist in making an assessment on whether criminal activity is taking place. This rapid assessment can be enhanced by becoming proficient with current technical support and understanding how to use this equipment and its information to confirm or deny one’s suspicion. Students are taught the capabilities of different technical equipment and the benefits and basics of providing technical support to law enforce- ment personnel.

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Discuss the functions of the IONSCAN, Cellebrite, TruNarc, Adventurer Pro NTEP balance, and Cummins JetScan iFX, and illustrate the skills necessary to perform daily operations.

  2. Discuss the value of the implementation history of technical support to assess the attributes necessary to perform daily operations to standard.

  3. Connect how technical support assists law enforcement agencies and can significantly affect the outcome of criminal case proceedings.

  4. Demonstrate the skills necessary to perform competently when testifying in court.

  5. Examine the importance of implementing a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) and employ the ability to accurately assemble the components that make up the SOP.

  6. Associate the effectiveness of proper use of technical support with assisting law enforcement agencies and other organizations.

  7. Employ the skills necessary to perform daily operations and complete the general preventative

maintenance for all equipment.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 2 days/16 hours (1.5 day classroom, .5 day practical exercise).

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Law Enforcement Agency Support, Military Intelligence.


TECHNOLOGY THREATS AND TRENDS IN NARCOTICS INVESTIGATIONS

This is a unique and eye-opening class for officers and prosecutors who want to learn more on how technology is being used to avoid or detect their narcotics investigations. In almost every major investigation and undercover drug buy, a variety of technologies are incorporated into the investigative process. However, most officers aren’t looking at what technologies their targets may be employing to avoid detection. This class will examine a number of different technologies from Caller ID spoofing to Steganography, but from an investigating officer’s perspective as it relates to their target.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Define a number of different technology terms and acronyms.

  2. List potential methods a target may use to avoid detection using technology.

  3. List potential technological methods a target may employ to identify police officers.

  4. Identify and use a number of open source search engines.

  5. Explain the role of social networking sites and their implication to law enforcement.

  6. Identify steps that an officer can take to better protect his information and identity.

  7. Identify resources in the law enforcement community that an officer can go to for additional information on investigative technology issues.

  8. Discuss the techniques a target can use to gain information about the narcotics officer.

  9. Discuss the techniques a target can use to avoid or circumvent an investigation usingtechnology.

  10. Describe how Caller ID works and how one can be identified even if blocking is employed.

  11. Describe the purpose of privacy settings on social networking sites and its importance to a law enforcement officer.

  12. Explain the importance of officers increasing their overall awareness of the types of technology in their environment, especially when serving a warrant.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 2 days/16 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Prosecutors, Law Enforcement Support, Military (Intel only).


TERROR THREAT FINANCE (DIA)

This is a five-day course covering the concepts of international money laundering as it pertains to drug trafficking.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the methods and background of terrorist financing.

  2. Describe the three phases of money laundering used to process illicit funds.

  3. Describe informal Value Transfer Systems.

  4. Recognize and describe unusual finance activity.

  5. Define threat finance interagency roles.

  6. Recognize and describe trade-based money laundering.

  7. Understand the virtual world and economies.

  8. Describe the process of Islamic banking.

  9. Recognize patterns and anomalies.

  10. Use social networking for link analysis.

  11. Describe commodity flows.

  12. Identify and exploit pertinent documentation.

  13. Explain and follow bank secrecy act reporting requirements.

  14. Perform a bank records analysis demo.

Prerequisites: None. Course Length: 5 days/40 hours.

Who May Attend: LEA Supoort, Military Intelligence.


TERRORISM INTELLIGENCE GATHERING

This course informs the participant about intelligence gathering techniques to combat terrorism. Emphasis is placed on the correlation between drug trafficking and terrorist activities. The street-level officer will become familiar with interview techniques specifically aimed at developing counter-terrorism intelligence and terrorism indicators derived from roadside interviews, observa- tions, citizen contacts, community members, arrestees, and arresting officers.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe an overview of the intelligence cycle.

  2. Give a brief introduction of the Islamic culture.

  3. Perform interview techniques specifically aimed at developing counter-narcoterrorism intelligence.

  4. Recognize narco-terrorism indicators during roadside stops.

  5. Accomplish roadside interviews that result in the identification of terrorists.

  6. Effectively handle terrorist arrest suspects and arresting officers.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 3 days/24 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Corrections, Military (Intel, SF, MP only), Law Enforce- ment Support (Intel only).


THREAT ASSESSMENT

This course is designed to educate homeland security, border patrol, and law enforcement profes- sionals on the military process of threat assessment. Students will learn how this process may be adopted/modified to suit civilian intelligence operations at the local, state, and federal levels. Furthermore, understanding of the military’s process and capabilities may facilitate requests for, and success during, joint operations. Through dynamic instruction, discussion, case study,and practical exercises, students will develop methods to effectively incorporate threat assessment to their agency.

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Summarize imperative definitions involved with threat assessment.

  2. Demonstrate ability to use Police Intelligence Operations Integration with the Operations Process.

  3. Identify different types of analysis and have the ability to appropriately analyze information provided.

  4. Identify key components of civilian threat assessment, its connection to military techniques, and possible modification to incorporate components of both to enhance joint operations and/ or interagency operations.

Prerequisites: Basic computer skills.

Course Length: 3 days/24 hours (2 days classroom, 1 day practical exercise).

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Law Enforcement Support.


TOP GUN: UNDERCOVER DRUG INVESTIGATION

Top Gun employs a mix of mediums to enhance learning. The course is built around a straightfor- ward fact scenario. The student will hear lectures and mini-lectures from experts on both the legal principles and the practical aspects of the topics. Immediately following each lecture, students

will participate in small group workshops, where they will have the opportunity to apply the fact scenario to the principles just learned. The student will hear lectures and participate in workshops in both portions of the course. In the investigative portion, the workshops are primarily discus- sion groups where students will also participate in skill-building exercises. These workshops are led by a faculty coordinator. Topics include investigative techniques, rules of evidence, courtroom techniques and presentations, hidden compartment investigations, warrant service techniques, surveillance techniques, interview and interrogation techniques, and asset seizure programs.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate specific techniques for controlling criminal informants.

  2. Describe reasons why police use various investigative techniques.

  3. List innovative and effective strategies for charging defendants.

  4. Receive and use updated search and seizure information.

  5. Examine search warrants and participate in the planning and the execution of search warrants.

  6. Participate in conducting foot and vehicular surveillance.

  7. Participate in tactical firearms training exercise.

  8. Describe investigators’ concerns.

  9. Describe specific techniques of controlling criminal informants.

  10. Explain how decisions impact the trial outcome.

  11. Execute a search warrant.

  12. List innovative and effective strategies used for charging defendants.

  13. Perform foot and vehicular surveillance.

  14. Use interview and interrogation skills.

  15. Demonstrate knowledge of search and seizure law.

  16. Describe prosecutors concerns.

  17. Describe forfeiture and money laundering techniques.

Prerequisites: NCTC certificate of completion for Basic Narcotics.

Course Length: 6 days/44 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Prosecutors (involved with narcotics investigations). Student selections are made by the sponsoring state agency, not NCTC.


TRAUMA MANAGEMENT

This military-led familiarization course is designed to provide law enforcement officials with an overview of trauma management techniques that can be executed as a team or by individual providers. In addition to instruction on select types of trauma and treatment, first responders are also taught to consider “big picture” aspects such as mental aspects of trauma management, tri- age, care under fire, collection, evacuation, and communication. The course culminates in a final exercise that uses all lessons learned via several scenarios where students demonstrate treatment, support, and leadership techniques.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain the mental readiness required and mental considerations that must be taken by team leaders, team members, and individual providers when initiating, managing, and terminating emergency trauma care to include post-event considerations.

  2. Describe the indicators and complications associated with penetrating trauma, burns, blasts, bleeding, shock, and environmental trauma.

  3. Demonstrate the skills required to treat casualties within the scope of training.

  4. Demonstrate the planning and execution of care under direct and indirect fire.

  5. Establish and secure a Casualty Collection Point (CCP), and securely lift/move casualty(ies) from the trauma site to the CCP.

  6. Establish a secure communications plan within the limits of available resources.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 2 days/16 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Corrections, Military.


UNDERCOVER MANAGEMENT

This course is designed for supervisors who are tasked with supervision or planning undercover operations. The course is designed to motivate and empower the student supervisor to effectively and safely supervise undercover operations and to be cognizant of the skills, tactics, and dangers associated with conducting such undercover narcotic operations. This course will also address methods of minimizing risks and focuses on tactical operation planning, field team deployment, undercover officer deployment, confidential informants, crisis management, documentation, of- ficer safety, integrity, cover surveillance, case management, drug recognition, common methods of drug packaging, and risk assessment.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Understand the role of undercover officers in drug investigations.

  2. Understand the supervisory responsibilities of undercover narcotics operations.

  3. Develop and execute a tactical operation plan.

  4. Identify and distinguish different kinds of drugs.

  5. Safely deploy field teams and undercover officers.

  6. Employ the safe use of confidential informants.

  7. Identify the rules for undercover officer safety and survival.

  8. Implement and analyze crisis management methods.

  9. Implement proper and effective documentation procedures.

  10. Recognize and identify potential operational dangers.

  11. Develop and employ effective surveillance techniques.

  12. Recognize potential operational hazards.

  13. Recognize the psychological danger signs relating to undercover officers.

  14. Identify the most common methods of drug packaging and paraphernalia associated with their use.

  15. Apply deconfliction procedures.

Prerequisites: Supervisor of undercover operations.

Course Length: 5 days/40 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement.


UNDERCOVER RISK ANALYSIS

This course is designed for law enforcement personnel working undercover narcotics operations, conducting surveillance of drug activities, participating in raids or arrests, or managing any of the above tactical operations. This course will identify and reinforce the principles of safe undercover, arrest, and raid tactics. Students will learn how to assess risk, determine if the risk is of an acceptable level, and then how to manage that risk. They will also learn when and how to “shut down” an operation due to excessive risk.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Define the terms “undercover,” “search warrant execution,” “arrest,” and “risk.”

  2. Discuss the factors that allow narcotics enforcement to be risk acceptable.

  3. Discuss what is meant by the terms “managing the risk” and “reacting to risk.”

  4. Identify the eight contemporary critical factors involved in undercover work.

  5. Design and implement an operational plan.

  6. Discuss what usually goes wrong within the confines of an operational plan.

  7. Describe the associated problems inherent with the use of communication equipment during tactical operations.

  8. Apply the terms “complacency,” “ego,” “stress,” and “common sense” as they apply to the undercover operative.

  9. Recognize and correct inaccurate conclusions from accurate observations.

  10. Describe and implement flashrolls.

  11. Describe and discuss accessibility of the undercover weapon.

  12. Determine the pros and cons of the undercover making the arrest based on each situation.

  13. Recognize and take proper action when there is loss of control during an undercover operation.

  14. Describe the concept of the risk triangle and be able to determine at what level of risk the operation is at.

  15. State reasons for the importance of control.

  16. Discuss the different roles of the undercover, the surveillance units, and the supervisor as they apply to the particular street operation.

  17. Discuss and implement the final formula for proper risk management. Prerequisites: Experience in undercover, surveillance, and arrest procedures. Course Length: 2 days/15 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement.


UNIT PREVENTION LEADER (UPL) (NGB)

This military-led course, Unit Prevention Leadership (UPL) for Army, certifies a service member to be the primary advisor to the Commander on all issues relating to the Substance Abuse Pro- gram IAW AR 600-85 and other DOD directives. Also, the UPL is certified to administer the drug urinalysis collection procedures IAW the above regulations. The certification of a UPL is valid for 18 months.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Provide advisement on all issues relating to the Substance Abuse Program.

  2. Perform specimen collection procedures.

  3. Package specimen for shipping.

  4. Prepare documentation. Prerequisites: None. Course Length: 5 hours.

Who May Attend: Military (PA Army National Guard).


VEHICLE INTERDICTION (COMMERCIAL)

This course provides students with the skills necessary to conduct successful commercial vehicle interdiction. It will equip students with the ability to make a rapid assessment on whether narcot- ics activity is taking place. This rapid assessment can be enhanced by becoming familiar with current criminal trends and understanding how to use this information to confirm or deny one’s suspicion. The skills learned during this course are taught, not only through the classroom, but through hands-on training and searching of commercial motor vehicles. Students are taught how to locate hidden compartments and electronic traps on these vehicles, as well as learning the vehicle’s natural voids.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate how to successfully locate narcotics in hidden compartments or electronic traps.

  2. Identify commercial trucks’ natural voids.

  3. Demonstrate the use of proper interview techniques on roadside encounters.

  4. Recognize both physical and behavioral indicators of deception.

  5. Observe and recognize indicators associated with narcotics activity.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 3 days/24 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Corrections, Military.


VEHICLE INTERDICTION (PASSENGER)

This course provides students with the skills necessary to conduct successful interdiction. It will equip students with the ability to make a rapid assessment on whether narcotics activity is taking place. This rapid assessment can be enhanced by becoming familiar with current criminal trends

and understanding how to use this information to confirm or deny one’s suspicion. The skills learned during this course are taught, not only through the classroom, but through hands-on training and searching of passenger motor vehicles. Students are taught how to locate hidden compartments and electronic traps on these vehicles, as well as learning the vehicle’s natural voids.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate how to successfully locate narcotics inside hidden compartments or electronic traps.

  2. Identify a vehicle’s natural voids.

  3. Demonstrate the use of proper interview techniques on roadside encounters.

  4. Recognize both physical and behavioral indicators of deception.

  5. Observe and recognize indicators associated with criminal activity.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 3 days/24 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Corrections, Military.


VIDEO SURVEILLANCE TRAINING FOR DRUG INVESTIGATIONS

Participants will learn how to use video to document crime scenes, accidents, and search war- rants, as well as shoot surveillance video, use night vision equipment with video cameras and link “body wire” receivers to camcorders.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Recognize the various videotape formats that have been sold or are for sale in North America.

  2. Label videotapes shot to document criminal activity so that they can be introduced as evidence in legal proceedings.

  3. Properly store and duplicate videotape evidence to meet generally accepted legal standards.

  4. Use the Macro feature on video camcorders to shoot close-ups.

  5. Properly use the most popular features found on current camcorders.

  6. Use the “Elements of Continuity” to shoot edit-free videotape.

  7. Use night scopes in conjunction with their video camcorders.

  8. Use microphones, earphones, and covert audio receivers with their camcorders.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 3 days/21 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Military (SF, MP only), Law Enforcement Support.


WOODLAND TACTICAL

This military-led course is designed to give a familiarization with basic tactical navigation and

surveillance techniques for use in the planning of safe and efficient woodland operations.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Plan a mission following the necessary procedures and policies.

  2. Mitigate risk factors by effectively identifying and strategizing to minimize the risks inherent to a mission.

  3. Conduct a patrol from a known point to an unknown point using proper movement techniques, hand and arm signals, and land navigation.

  4. Develop a mission-oriented packing list and conduct pre-mission equipment checks for accountability and serviceability.

  5. Demonstrate basic first aid procedures, teamwork supporting those procedures, and elements affecting response of medical care.

  6. Apply proper camouflage procedures during the creation of an effective hide site.

  7. Successfully complete a field training exercise by applying the course objectives to a given situation.

Prerequisites: None.

Course Length: 3 days/24 hours.

Who May Attend: Law Enforcement, Corrections, Military.